Browsing Category

History

History

19 Groundbreaking Women Composers – Part 2

June 19, 2018

Emmy-winning classical composer Julie Giroux says she didn’t know about any women composers when she was studying music, and when she first entered the field she didn’t meet any, either. Unfortunately, she is not alone in this experience. It’s only in the last few decades that women composers have begun to be recognized in some of the music industry’s top areas.

Continue Reading…

History

19 Groundbreaking Women Composers – Part 1

May 22, 2018

Quietly, in places ranging from convents to conservatories to farms, extraordinary women have written innovative music without the benefit of fame. Historical archives hint at the challenges they have faced. Critics called composer Ethel Smyth a “little woman” with “utterly unfeminine” works, and Florence Price echoed the concerns of other minority women when she penned in a famous letter: “To begin with I have two handicaps – those of sex and race.”

Continue Reading…

History

Silent No More: Mount Vernon Makes Harpsichord History

February 19, 2018

The harpsichord holds an important place in music history. Its unique sound is instantly recognizable, flavoring the works of countless composers from the Renaissance, Baroque and Classical periods. The historic harpsichord at Mount Vernon is of special interest to John Watson, Curator Emeritus of Musical Instruments for Colonial Williamsburg. It’s an instrument modern ears have had no way to hear… until now.

Continue Reading…

History

Edition Peters: Bringing Sheet Music to the Masses

January 3, 2018

Great music tells a great story. Be it the story of a moment, the story of a feeling, or the story of a generation, music delivers the message in ways that mere words cannot. The ability to print sheet music spread these stories to people around the world. One of the earliest purveyors of printed music was the company C.F. Peters; in fact, the company was so closely linked to the spread of sheet music that the story of C.F. Peters is, truly, the story of printed music.

Continue Reading…

History

Exploring the Sound of Patriotism

May 20, 2015

Music is widely seen as a window into the spirit of the time it was written. Patriotic music is a prime example of this. The experience of a nation is told through patriotic music in a way that other forms of music often miss. Whether it be the pride of victory or a vocal expression of the beauty a nation possesses, there is something about patriotic music that speaks directly to national identity.

Continue Reading…

History

7 Things You Didn’t Know About The Star-Spangled Banner

August 15, 2014

We’ve already spent some time exploring the history of The Star-Spangled Banner, but there are still a lot of interesting facts that you may not know.  You may have heard the tune comes from a drinking song (false) or that the range of the song makes it difficult for your average person to sing (very true).  It’s surprising to think that, after 200 years, there are a lot of things we don’t know about our national anthem.  Such as…

Continue Reading…

History

The Star-Spangled Banner, 1914 to 2014

August 11, 2014

The centennial of The Star-Spangled Banner brought a renewed interest in the song and the story of how it came to be written.  Though the United States would not enter World War I until 1916, the conflict in Europe was on the minds of Americans everywhere and the knowledge that they may soon become embroiled in a foreign conflict loomed over them.

Continue Reading…

History

The Star-Spangled Banner, 1814 to 1913

August 1, 2014

In the 200 years since Francis Scott Key wrote the words to The Star-Spangled Banner (then The Defense of Fort M’Henry), the song has proved to be just as resilient as the spirits of those who inspired it.  The story of how the song was written is one that most Americans know.  However, between its writing and today, the song has been through a number of changes, some subtle, some not.

Continue Reading…

History

50 Years of Wingert-Jones Music

March 7, 2014

It was the Mid-West National Band Clinic, 1964. Merrill Jones sat alone at a table with his publishing company’s entire catalog — one piece by Claude T. Smith, a well-known band director in the area around Kansas City.

Continue Reading…