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The Ahn Trio: A Powerful Force in the Music World

February 8, 2011

A few months ago I came across a program on PBS called On Canvas: The Ahn Trio which presented a live performance from Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.  Three young ladies, Angella, Lucia, and Maria, are sisters who were born in Seoul, Korea and eventually moved to the United States.  They had the good fortune of being classically trained at The Julliard School of Music in New York City.  Angella is the violinist, Maria is the cellist, and Lucia plays piano within the trio.

Growing up, they learned to play and appreciate the classical compositions of Mozart, Beethoven, Dvorak, and Smetana.  But the Ahn Trio have also been performing commissioned pieces by modern-day composers such as Pat Metheny, Michael Nyman, Kenji Bunch, and Paul Schoenfield, just to name a few.  These young ladies are not afraid to think outside the box regarding the music that they play, exploring various forms of artistic expression by combining performances filled with other types of performing and visual artists.  The Ahn sisters have collaborated with painters, dancers, pop singers, DJs, photographers, and other artistic groups, adding even more energy and excitement to their shows while still displaying their classical prowess.

They are also making their presence known on the record charts, too.  They’ve recorded CDs such as Paris Rio; Dvorak, Suk, Shostakovich:  Piano Trios;  Ahn-Plugged;  Groovebox and Lullaby for My Favorite Insomniac. They’ve even recorded a European version of Lullaby for My Favorite Insomniac made exclusively for iTunes.  This was number eight on the Billboard Classical chart for 26 weeks.  The trio has been touring for the last ten years and are already scheduled to perform in 2011 at high schools, universities, and concert halls within the United States and around the globe.

The Ahn sisters don’t just play concerts, they’ve also been performing and teaching at musical workshops and master classes nationally and internationally.  Their success just doesn’t seem to stop. Their talent, flair and style are recognized by magazines like Time, GQ, People and Vogue.  Photographers such as Walter Chin and Ellen von Unwerth  have captured their young faces  and popular retailers like Anne Klein, Gap and The Bodyshop have featured the Ahn Trio in ad campaigns.  These young ladies will definitely make your ears perk up and take notice of their musical talents when you listen to them play.  Then you’ll truly understand why the Ahn Trio is a powerful force in the music world.

http://www.ahntrio.com/v2/

http://www.ahntrio.com/v2/ahntrio.html

http://video.whyy.org/video/1524351067/

http://www.facebook.com/ahntrio

http://www.myspace.com/ahntrio

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VT2SOv2Z0E

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A Different Role

July 23, 2010

Recently I met with one of my former professors, a terrific mentor and now colleague.  Addressing him by his first name is a bit surreal after many years of sitting in his classroom.  The purpose of the meeting began rather selfishly:

  1. We both enjoy a good cup of coffee.
  2. I needed to retrieve my graded final paper in hopes of using it as a writing sample should I ever need to submit one.
  3. I am one of those academic types that actually enjoys research and I wanted to bounce around a few ideas.

Conversation led from one thing to another, from suggestions for expansion of that final research topic from a different perspective, to my family, my work at J.W. Pepper and the proverbial “so, now what?”

Does that question ever go away?  His answer of course was one that I and many of you already know — no, it does not.  No matter what the circumstance, our role simply changes.  After more than one cup of great coffee,  I came away with lots of other suggestions and advice as well!

That is the beautiful and lasting thing about teachers that have touched our lives — we never stop wanting their advice.   Perhaps we can all do more to take on the role of giving good counsel to others in the field of music.  I will start here with sharing this interesting article from the New York Times about openings at the nation’s major orchestras:

Need a Job? Help Wanted at the N.Y. Philharmonic

Archive

A New Spectrum of Performance

April 28, 2010

When we think of classical music we conjure sounds of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Ravel, Wagner, and Copland, among others.  But it’s no secret that with that love of the classics often comes a noticeable hesitation to embrace contemporary classical music,  a genre encompassing works composed from the mid-1970s to the present day.

Finding an audience for modern music that is perceived as awkward and unpleasant is not easy.  Fortunately there are major orchestras that, through artist residency programs, openly support works from new composers.  But should we as listeners take a chance on contemporary classical music?  As rhetorical as this question might sound, I believe that I have nothing to lose and attempting to answer it will only help the longevity of classical music as a whole.  In other words, why not?

In this spirit of artistic adventure I attended the debut performance of The New Spectrum Ensemble, a group of San Francisco musicians founded with a mission to combine the old and the new, an innovative approach to programming that pairs classical favorites with contemporary unknowns.  The inaugural concert, held Saturday, April 17, featured the following selections: 

Spaces Between (2006) – Jen Wang

Sonata, for cello and piano – Elliott Carter (b. 1908)

Sonata for Cello and Piano in D major, op. 102 no. 2 – Ludwig van Beethoven

S.T.I.C. (1995) – Dan Becker (b. 1960)

This was a new kind of symphonic experience, an auditory buffet that introduced me to contemporary music paired with pieces that were not so contemporary, without program notes or a pre-concert lecture.  Instead, prior to each piece the members of the ensemble would demonstrate each piece’s contrasting styles through the recitation of  “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.”  It was fascinating to realize the vast differences between Beethoven’s counterpoint and Carter’s complexity, explained through a well-known folk tune.

This process gave the audience a chance to learn about each piece and the composer’s creative approach that created it.  It enabled us to personalize the music as it was played, therefore making it more difficult to dismiss it as inaccessible.   Kathyrn Bates Williams, founding member and cellist, states in her blog,  “Listening to all music is important.  It distinguishes the artistic values that we appreciate and those we don’t.  It brings us surprises both good and bad.”  I can’t help but agree with her.  It’s a risk, a small risk that we take in seeing contemporary concerts, equivalent to trying a  new restaurant.

After the concert we filed into the lobby where the composers Jen Wang and Dan Becker mingled with the audience.  Suddenly it dawned on me how important it was for these two artists that there even was an audience, that it possibly didn’t matter whether or not I actually liked their music.

This is an extremely liberating concept for me as a listener and performer.  The New Spectrum Ensemble strives to promote contemporary composers, and to accomplish that it took me on a strange journey made available through their unique, tongue-in-cheek programming.   My journey might result in me not liking everything that I hear and that’s ok.  In the end all that matters is that I showed up and listened.

Meet the members of the New Spectrum Ensemble here: www.thenewspectrum.com.  Additionally, if you are interested in learning more about contemporary classical music or just looking for an informative website from one of today’s most entertaining musical thinkers, please check out Alex Ross, music writer for The New Yorker.  His website and blog are located at www.therestisnoise.com